Seafood

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  • Country Origin: France
IMAGE 1- If our sardines are so tasty, it is because they are prepared "old-fashioned" with fresh fish. This traditional preparation, perpetuated in a Breton cannery, consists of gutting and then topping the sardines by hand. Lightly fried, they are then covered with an extra organic virgin olive oil which enriches their flavor and gives them this exceptional fondant. Delicately placed in the can by hand, they retain all their finesse and richness of taste even on your plate, to the delight of your taste buds! Like good wine, sardines get better as they age because they crystallize in oil. Just keep the boxes in a cool place and turn them around every month. A box kept for at least three years turns out to be a real treat. Sardines are naturally rich in Omega 3 and are also a source of calcium if eaten with the bone. / IMAGE 2- Albert Ménès sprats were caught in the Baltic Sea and carefully prepared by hand with fresh whole fish. Gutted and then topped by hand, they are then cleaned and delicately smoked with beech wood using an old-fashioned smoking process to reveal the full power and flavor of their tender flesh. Once prepared, they are placed by hand in their box and candied in oil. / IMAGE 3- These nets are worked from sardines caught in the North-East Atlantic Ocean. Carefully selected for their quality and their lack of imperfection, the sardines are minutely threaded before cooking. The fillets are then delicately placed by hand in their box and covered with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil with a fruity taste, which enriches their flavor and ensures excellent preservation. / IMAGE 4- Harvested by hand from cod caught in Icelandic seas, Albert Ménès cod livers are trimmed manually before being smoked in beech wood and cooked in their box. No oil is added, it exudes from the liver naturally during cooking. Each year of fishing constitutes a vintage apart, knowing that a cod liver improves with time, just like wine. / IMAGE 5- Harvested by hand from cod caught in Icelandic seas, the livers are trimmed manually before being smoked in beech wood and cooked in their box. No oil is added, it exudes from the liver naturally during cooking. / IMAGE 6- Harvested by hand from cod caught in Icelandic seas, the livers are trimmed manually before being smoked in beech wood and cooked in their box. No oil is added, it exudes from the liver naturally during cooking. / IMAGE 7- This tuna is of the Albacore variety, the finest and rarest quality of tuna. Its flesh is clear, hence its name of white tuna. As soon as they arrive at the factory, the fresh fish are headed, gutted, cleaned, and cut into pieces. The sides that will be used to make the fillets are insulated and cooked in court-bouillon. Each fillet is then delicately detached by hand, put in a box and covered with extra virgin olive oil. This very meticulous work, because these nets are fragile, and these different operations require a very qualified workforce. Small Atlantic white tuna only gives 3 to 6 cans of fillets per fish. The fillet is the most noble part of the tuna, it is the equivalent of the beef fillet or the pork tenderloin. / IMAGE 8- This tuna is of the Albacore variety, the finest and rarest quality of tuna. Its flesh is clear, hence its name of white tuna. Young albacore tuna follow the rise of the warm waters of the Gulf -Stream in summer, stumble across the Irish and Breton continental shelves and set off again to winter in the Azores. The fish are caught off the Brittany coast. As soon as they arrive, the fresh fish are headed, gutted, cleaned, and cut into pieces. The sides are set aside and will be used to make tuna fillets (the noblest part of the fish). Natural white tuna is simply trimmed, brined, cooked and canned. / IMAGE 9- This tuna is of the Albacore variety, the finest and rarest quality of tuna. Its flesh is clear, hence its name of white tuna. Young albacore tuna follow the rise of the warm waters of the Gulf Stream in summer, stumble across the Irish and Breton continental shelves and set off again to winter in the Azores. The fish are caught off the Brittany coast. As soon as they arrive, the fresh fish are headed, gutted, cleaned and cut into pieces. The sides are set aside and will be used to make tuna belly (the noblest part of the fish). The pieces are cooked in a short broth, stripped of their skin and then cut. They are then placed in the boxes, covered with extra virgin olive oil and pasteurized. / IMAGE 10- These special boxes are created each year and numbered. The vintage sardines are chosen for their size, larger than that of the usual sardines. They are thus more fleshy and lend themselves all the better to confectionery in olive oil. These large-sized sardines are caught in the Atlantic Ocean at the end of the season. Carefully selected and prepared "old-fashioned" with fresh fish, they are gutted, pollarded and then cleaned by hand. They are then placed upright on grids and then dried. Plunged into a frying bath and then drained, in order to remove the excess fat, they are then hulled by hand and delicately placed in their box. Oil extra virgin olive which covers them enriches their flavor and thus ensures excellent preservation. Like good wine, sardines get better as they age because they crystallize in oil. Just keep the boxes in a cool place and turn them around every month. A box kept for at least three years turns out to be a real treat. Sardines are naturally rich in Omega 3 and are also a source of calcium if eaten with the bone. / IMAGE 11- The Albert Ménès vintage anchovies are fleshy and tasty because they are caught at the time of the season when they are at their peak of maturity, in the North-East of the Atlantic Ocean. Prepared "old-fashioned" with fresh fish, they are worked by hand and delicately placed in their box one by one. The drizzle of extra virgin olive oil that accompanies them enriches their flavor and ensures excellent preservation. Like good wine, anchovies improve with age. Just hold the box in a cool place and turn it around every month / IMAGE 12- Our sardines, fished in the Atlantic Ocean, are carefully selected and prepared "old-fashioned" with fresh fish. Gutted and then topped by hand, they are then cleaned before drying on a rack. Plunged in a deep-frying bath then drained, in order to eliminate the excess fat, they are hulled by hand before passing one by one between the hands of specialized workers who will remove the edges with a very special knack . Finally, they are delicately placed in their box under a cover of extra virgin olive oil which enriches their flavor and thus ensures excellent preservation. Like good wine, sardines get better as they age because they crystallize in oil. Just keep the boxes in a cool place and turn them around every month. A box kept for at least three years turns out to be a real gourmet treat. Sardines are naturally rich in Omega 3 and are also a source of calcium if eaten with the bone. / IMAGE 13- These herrings, resulting from a reasoned fishing respecting the environment, come from the North-East Atlantic. Carefully worked by hand to remove the bones without damaging the flesh, these herring fillets are delicately smoked and have a beautiful amber color and a particularly melting texture. / IMAGE 14- Specificity Albert Ménès, this real lobster bisque is guaranteed prepared with blue lobster, fully processed, returned to fresh butter then flambéed with "fine Champagne" Cognac. The bisque is therefore prepared with the carcass and lobster flesh, which gives it this delicate flavor.