FRUIT PROUDUCTS

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  • Country Origin: Germany
IMAGE 1- Acerola Cherries The acerola cherry is a stone fruit (or drupe) with white-yellowish pulp. The color of its skin ranges from green to red depending on the degree of ripeness. Eaten fresh, it has a pleasant, slightly sour taste. As it is very sensitive, the fruit is immediately processed into fruit puree or concentrate after harvest to preserve its valuable vitamin C. The acerola cherry has one of the highest natural vitamin C contents of all known fruits – roughly 30 times higher than orange juice, which makes acerola an ideal product for strengthening the immune system. However, because the vitamin C content of the fruit decreases as it ripens, both puree and concentrate are available in various qualities with varying amounts of vitamin C, as well as in organic grades. In addition to healthy vitamin C, the acerola cherry also contains large amounts of riboflavin and is entitled to nutritional claims according to the European Health Claim and Food Information Regulation and/or EFSA expert opinions. Acerola is used to enrich food products with natural vitamin C and is often mixed with other fruit ingredients. With its slightly sour taste, it is also frequently used in jams and dairy products. As an antioxidant, the multifunctional fruit also stabilizes drinks, ice cream, and fruit preserves. Bösch Boden Spies acerola products come from Brazil. Our exclusive brand partner Niagro is the world’s largest acerola producer and specialist with over 25 years of experience, and responds to customer wishes with specific productions that can be realized thanks to the fruit’s year-round availability. / IMAGE 2- Wild Blueberries In contrast to cultivated blueberries, the wild berries grow only where they feel at home. For more than 10,000 years, the wild bushes have enriched the countryside of the Quebec region and the Atlantic coast of Canada. Wild blueberries contain less water; in a dried state they are roughly pea-sized. Their hallmark is a multilayered aroma with sweet as well as slightly spicy notes. The fruits are rich in anthocyanins, antioxidative plant dyes that protect the body’s cells from free radicals. These substances are found primarily in the dark skin. At the same time wild blueberries put the “light” in “delightful,” weighing in at just 57 kilocalories per 100 g serving. They provide filling fiber, and contain vitamins C and A as well as potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium. Food producers can use dried wild blueberries to enhance the taste and function of baked goods, chocolate, cereal bars, fruit-and-nut mixtures, and much more. They are robust and easy to process, don’t burst open during baking or other production processes, and the final product benefits from their healthy image. Our partner Oxford Frozen Foods is the world’s largest supplier of frozen wild blueberries, with many other grades in their range, such as blueberry juice and dried blueberries. / IMAGE 3- Boysenberries Boysenberries are a cross between raspberries, blackberries and loganberries and unites the best of these three fruits. This deep red berry consists of many individual little fruits. It is round in shape and about twice the size of a raspberry. Its sweet, slightly sour aroma is simultaneously reminiscent of raspberries and blackberries. The “invention” of the fruit dates back to 1920. It was named after the Californian breeder Rudolph Boysen. Since the 1930s, boysenberries have also been cultivated in New Zealand – now one of the largest cultivation areas, with ideal conditions. Its high vitamin C content, protective plant dyes (anthocyanins), iron, and dietary fibers justify the boysenberry’s reputation as a true superfruit. Their balanced taste and health-promoting properties makes them perfect for use in juices, dairy products, jams, jellies or ice cream. Bösch Boden Spies cooperates with Boysenberries New Zealand Limited, the world’s largest exporter. The company sets very high quality standards, with exceptionally accurate traceability for each batch. / IMAGE 4- Cranberry These berries from North America owe their name to the similarity between their flowers and a crane’s head. Cranberries grow on low, evergreen groundcover plants. Because they contain four air chambers inside, cranberries are harvested in a special way: The fields in which they grow are flooded. This causes the berries to break off the shrub and float up to the surface, from where they are gathered by suction. Fresh cranberries taste sour and rather tart. They only gain sweetness and their characteristic cranberry flavor in a dried state, with the addition of sugar. Consumers value the berries for their versatile qualities: besides their flavor and bright red color, their health-promoting effects make the fruit a sought-after product. The berries’ firm consistency and fruity flavor convey a full-bodied, fruity taste to granola and granola bars, confectionery, toppings, dressings, and sauces, and are also a component of cheese and pastry products. Whether dried, as a concentrate, frozen, or as an innovatively flavored fruit ingredient – in each case cranberries ensure accentuations of color and flavor. Bösch Boden Spies is a trusted partner of the world market leader Ocean Spray, whose product range comprises more than 40 different cranberry products tailored to the food industry. The company was founded in 1930 by three independent cranberry farmers and is now a cooperative that unites more than 700 producers of the small red fruit in North America and Chile. / IMAGE 5- Goldenberries Goldenberries are golden-yellow berries that grow in the sunny Andean regions of Ecuador and Colombia in South America. They are also known as Physalis, Inca berries, or cape gooseberries. The herbaceous climbing plants grow to a height of 1.5 meters (about 5 ft) and are covered in fine hairs, including on their egg-shaped, tapering leaves. Once the goldenberry blossoms have been fertilized, their sepals continue to grow and form a husk around the berries so that they are already provided with beautiful packaging by nature. The fruits are later carefully harvested by hand. Even when just a small amount is added, goldenberries are clearly recognizable by their unique taste and balanced sugar-acidity profile. They are very valuable as an ingredient in nut and berry mixes, chocolates, jams, and juices. Goldenberries have great appeal because of their characteristic, sweet-sour taste – and, on the other hand, they have natural antioxidants, are rich in fiber, contain iron and phosphorus, lots of vitamin C (about 30 mg/100 g) and vitamin B1, and are a natural source of the cell-protecting substance provitamin A. Goldenberries can be used in various forms, e.g., dried – with or without sugar – or sweetened with pineapple juice, or as a juice concentrate. Terrafertil, the world’s largest producer of goldenberries, ensures consistently high product quality, and supplies Bösch Boden Spies with goldenberries. / IMAGE 6- Grapefruit The grapefruit – a cross between the orange and the pomelo – was discovered on the island of Barbados in the early 18th century. Some 130 years later, farmers in Florida first cultivated them commercially. Today, grapefruits are grown in nearly all subtropical countries where other citrus fruits are also produced. The fruits of the grapefruit tree are round, have a yellow or pink peel, and a diameter of 10–15 cm (4–6 in). The pulp is divided into segments, which are, however, interconnected. Its flesh can be yellow, pink, or even red. The taste of a grapefruit ranges from very sour to sweet and sour, and depending on the variety can also be slightly to markedly bitter. With a vitamin C content of 41 mg per 100 g, few calories, almost no fat, and a lot of pectin (fiber), the grapefruit is among the healthiest fruits of them all. This is also due to the many bitter substances, with their favorable effects on the stomach and intestines. We source our grapefruit juice concentrate from Granor Passi. The company is headquartered in South Africa, one of the best fruit-growing regions in the world. / IMAGE 6- Mangos Mangos are now cultivated in nearly all tropical and subtropical countries. The stone fruit grows on a tree that can soar to heights of up to 30 meters (nearly 100 feet). A leathery peel, green and sometimes with red markings, surrounds the juicy fruit pulp and the flat, large mango pit. A mature mango tastes wonderfully sweet and is considered very healthy despite its high sugar content – because mangoes are rich in vitamin C, vitamin E, and B vitamins, e.g., vitamin B1 and folic acid. Among all varieties of fruit, this exotic treat delivers the highest content of provitamin A, which plays an important role in cell renewal, the body’s defenses, and the visual process. Mangoes are very versatile and especially popular in beverages, e.g., as juice or nectar, in cocktails, shakes, lassis, and smoothies. The fruit is also perfect for preserving as jam or compote / IMAGE 7- Passion fruit Passion fruit originally came from Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina. Today, it is cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. From a botanical point of view, the passion fruit is a berry. The ripe fruit is yellow, oval in shape, about 10 cm long, and has a smooth skin. Inside are innumerable seeds, encased in yellowish-orange, juicy, jelly-like jackets, known as arils. But there is much more to the fruit than meets the eye. Besides a high vitamin C content, passion fruit contains large quantities of the B vitamins niacin and riboflavin. The former has an antioxidant effect and is important for the regeneration of the skin, muscles, and nerves. The second supports metabolic functions. The aromatic, sweet taste of the passion fruit is perfect for ice cream and desserts and is found in many dairy products in the Central European region. Passion fruit juice is also very popular. Ecuador and Peru are the largest exporters of passion fruit concentrate and juice concentrate. They cover 80–85% of the global market demand. Our partner Quicornac operates production sites in both countries. As a family business, it has more than 25 years of experience in the production of direct juice, juice concentrate, and puree with seeds. / IMAGE 8- Passion fruit Passion fruit originally came from Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina. Today, it is cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. From a botanical point of view, the passion fruit is a berry. The ripe fruit is yellow, oval in shape, about 10 cm long, and has a smooth skin. Inside are innumerable seeds, encased in yellowish-orange, juicy, jelly-like jackets, known as arils. But there is much more to the fruit than meets the eye. Besides a high vitamin C content, passion fruit contains large quantities of the B vitamins niacin and riboflavin. The former has an antioxidant effect and is important for the regeneration of the skin, muscles, and nerves. The second supports metabolic functions. The aromatic, sweet taste of the passion fruit is perfect for ice cream and desserts and is found in many dairy products in the Central European region. Passion fruit juice is also very popular. Ecuador and Peru are the largest exporters of passion fruit concentrate and juice concentrate. They cover 80–85% of the global market demand. Our partner Quicornac operates production sites in both countries. As a family business, it has more than 25 years of experience in the production of direct juice, juice concentrate, and puree with seeds. / IMAGE 9- Oranges The orange is a cross between the tangerine and the pomelo. The sweet citrus fruit probably arrived in the 15th century with Portuguese ships sailing from India to Europe, where it has been highly sought after ever since. The fragrances of the aromatic fruit are used in the perfume industry in many ways. But above all, it has become all but impossible to imagine our menus without the orange anymore – it has become indispensable in every conceivable form, whether as juice at breakfast, as an ingredient in fruit salad, in ice cream, or as dried orange peel for flavoring many different dishes. The orange is considered as a classic supplier of vitamin C (approx. 50 mg/100 g) and can meet the daily requirement with just one fruit. In addition, it contains a number of B vitamins and the red plant dye carotene, a precursor of vitamin A, which is particularly important for a healthy nervous system and for the visual process. Bösch Boden Spies oranges come from South Africa. Our partner Granor Passi offers juice concentrates and orange cells made from the best fresh produce. / IMAGE 10- Prunes The original variety of Californian plum was imported to California in the 19th century by Louis Pellier from his home country, France. The plants found ideal conditions in the fertile valleys warmed by California sunshine. Plums that are processed into prunes are among the few fruits that are allowed to ripen on the tree before harvest. In late summer, the fruit has achieved perfect firmness and sugar content – and this is when the plums are harvested from the tree. The fruits lose much of their water content during the subsequent drying process. Whether used as a powder, as bits, diced, pureed, or as concentrate – prunes contain a unique combination of nutrients that make them interesting beyond their taste. For example, they contain a high proportion of sorbitol as well as fiber and are rich in vitamin A, copper, and potassium. Because they also have a lot of natural antioxidants, they can be used to halt oxidative processes and extend the shelf life of food products. Another effect becomes evident in baked goods: Prunes bind moisture before and during baking – and thus keep the baked goods fresh longer. They also naturally enhance the flavor intensity of sauces. Thanks to their combination of sorbitol and fruit acids, prunes can even help to lower salt and sugar content in sauces or avoid the usage of caramel color. A full third of global prune production now comes from California, where our partner Sunsweet is based. A cooperative of more than 300 farmers, it is now the world’s most popular prune brand. / IMAGE 11- Raisins Not all raisins are created equal. Ours come from California and are dried grapes of the Thompson Seedless variety. They are dried on the vine (DOV) or on the ground. They have a slight caramel flavor, from the fruit sugar caramelizing in the sun during the drying process. Due to their low pH, their natural sugars, and the lower water activity, raisins are not very microbiologically sensitive, and fulfill the highest quality and specification standards. Raisins are very bake-stable and versatile for use as an ingredient in fruit-nut blends, salads, cereals, and cookies. Their taste profile, too, makes them interesting for the chocolate and baked-goods industry. In the form of soft raisins – which have a 24–28% moisture content due to hot water-vapor treatment and do not have to be softened before processing – they are used in baking as well as in the yoghurt sector. Raisins are also available in the form of concentrated juice and paste, as a natural humectant and preservative agent for the baking and flavoring industries. Our partner Sun-Maid has more than a century of experience in the product, and operates the world’s largest raisin and dried-fruit factory. The company uses industry-leading technologies and state-of-the-art agricultural practices to guarantee a high level of food safety and quality. / IMAGE 12-Tomatoes The origins of the tomato lie in Central and South America, where it was cultivated by the Mayans and other peoples. We have Christopher Columbus and the Spanish conquistadors, who brought the plant to Europe, to thank for its cultivation in our latitudes. Centuries of cultivation have led to the existence of about 2,500 varieties worldwide. The fine red fruit has become a versatile favorite in nearly every cuisine around the world. Its high-quality ingredients support the health of the entire body. Tomatoes are said to provide protection from heart disease and arteriosclerosis – thanks to lycopene, a substance with antioxidant properties. It is interesting to note that the lycopene in tomato puree or juice is much more easily absorbed by the body than that found in fresh products. Tomatoes are also an important supplier of vitamins, minerals and trace elements. They are low-calorie, healthy and are making their way into more and more food categories. Due to the demand for new flavors, tomato yogurt, snack products with dried tomatoes, or savory tomato spreads have become quite commonplace. Besides serving the European food industry’s demand for high-quality tomato products, Bösch Boden Spies also constantly develops new ideas for creating new sales potentials for this powerhouse of the fruit kingdom. Our partners include Morningstar and Unfasa as well as some of the foremost manufacturers in Spain. Our juice concentrates, NFC, diced tomatoes, puree and organic products all come from cultivation areas with the highest quality standards.